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20110716
20110716
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
is called big thicket. jasper, texas. >> to big thicket a crack is a buck shot, a stick broke, cracked headlights. crack, the big thicket we go 2 sticks. drink, drink, light, light. stagger in the road. statistic o statistic broke. the light, buck shot light. >> buck on stagger. what you looking at. the white stick. along the trees, along the trees. the buck staggering home. the crack. big thicket. what are you doing here? >> stick broke. white light. break for home. white homing. ha, ha, go, go, buck shot, kra e crack, crack, crack. hit lights. what you think you are. >> ha, ha, stick broke. in the brushes. in the rushes. put them back on. bufks head in the rushes. put them back on. to big thicket we go, hot we go to hit staggeringly along the frees. crack, a steak broke. we go, go, go, buck shot. we go, go, go. up the road. road kill. staggering bucks. head light rushes. pick up brushes. race broke, screeching. the big thicket we go, buck shot, crack. the road kills. crack e a broke stick. on we go on. [applause] >> omni bus program. and choose to muses are exciting because they
. very good. wow. what is that. the lake. not the lake. big river. wow. what? many bridges. the bridge is very old. so, don't go plenty more all right. so. this is a real birds eye view. very good. someone is flying like me. i remember his face in my japanese history book. his real name is,foto shim. hi. good to see you. so, many messengers down there. so, they are waiving you. why are they waiving me. to take me. the end of my life. i'm dying now. oh, my god. so, any way i don't want to - that the river. must be the sticks i don't want to cross the sticks and die because i have no money. so, six months for currency in japan. cost of six bucks. i have no money so see you later. hey! so go to this. go to the east. [birds chirping] any way i'm safe as long as i still with birds. okay. wow. what's that coming towards me. okay. i should grab it. a kind of pole. hey, hey! i'm safe. so, any way, let's get to the - got to get out of here. go. get out of here. where am i? whoa this morning the sunrise is very beautiful. that mountain. i'm still in japan. wow i'm lucky. and there's a pla
instruments. >> (speaking spanish). >> so they use the surroundings and big jars and they used to have water or other type was drinks. >> (speaking spanish). >> covered with leather skin. >> (speaking spanish). >> and they make the drums. >>. >> (speaking spanish). (drums). (applause). >> (speaking spanish). >> this instrument is called dungo. >> spr (speaking spanish). >> we have two but only one was used. >> (speaking spanish). >> this is one that was used north of the capital. >> (speaking spanish). >> in the cities of the country >> (speaking spanish). >> when he was a child he was able to see those instruments and on extension today. (drums). (applause) . >> this is a donkey's jaw. it could be a horse or a donkey. >> donkey's jaw. >> and it's played by spiking it and to make the rattle sound and also creates this. (applause). >> (speaking spanish) sorry. (speaking spanish). >> this is the kahita and it is created as the -- i don't know that word. how do you say that? the piggy bank. you know where the boxes and the churches collect money? yeah. this is the original he here. yeah.
. it did, but it was three decades. this is sunset boulevard being put in. there were putting in this big boulevard. it is pointing out a goalie in the middle of the sand. -- a gully in the middle of the sand. >> woody was just given this time. >> i have been wanting one of these for years. i know they were at 5300. >> the building is still there. >> they were not the most enlightened company. they were strict about not showing homes to minorities. they got in trouble for that. willie brown actually made his name by going and trying to see one of the homes. it was a very political thing. he would walk up with a whole bunch of people in the person showing the home would sneak away. >> even in the teens, there were a lot of neighborhoods that had restrictions against certain groups of people. >> this was in the 1950's. willie mays had trouble buying a house in san francisco. a couple of people would not show him a house. they had to enlist the mayor and a bunch of people. this is their reservoir. companies would take a block and there would start wrecking houses. there were building two a d
. >> there ago. maybe there are more. >> we have a big article on race tracks on our website. outsidelands.org. >> the ingleside, you can still see that. >> they developed where that race track was, just south of ocean avenue, they kept the oval of the race track and created urbano drive. >> i think we have some progress of that. >> that is the inner sunset. that is where >> lawrence lives > i do. >> you can see the inner sandbank. it is a big old sand hill. they had to do a lot of grading. >> in the building department, when we go out and look to people to building development, as soon as they squared away the top 6 inches or whatever is there, it is all sand. forever. in my yard, and there is nothing you can do about it. it is what there is. it was generally developed in response to the 1890's for mid- winter there, which was held in golden gate park. would the first buildings that was built in that area was a bar called the little shamrock, and it is still there just west of lincoln, just west from ninth avenue. it was built to help service people who were working on the big winter fair
against those in your district. >> we definitely have a few big projects for issues -- or issues we're paying a lot of attention to and we will continue to devote a lot of attention to, both myself and my staff. one of biggest ones is the planned development of the new campus for california and pacific medical center. that has dominated a lot of city-wide dialogue in the past few years. that project is slated to go forward or get through the entitlement process this year in city hall. if you are not familiar, we currently have a california campus and a pacific campus, and the plan is to build a bigger campus and consolidate those services into one larger hospital at the old cathedral hill spa on van ness, and that is going to have a huge impact, both in terms of the neighborhood in district 2, not only the new campus, but what happens to the pacific and california campus. also, is a huge job creator. we're making sure to do it in a way to we have every constituent buy into the project, create a ton of new jobs, and move forward with a health care system that benefits all of us. othe
it done. i should have brought a big bag or something like that. any way i just put his head - and then then stash him in my kimono. i can't get in front of them. easy. this is a big hour. my next victim. [snickering quietly] next. bet i capture 150. my body is full of many herring. [laughing] where is my robe. it's missing. a temple god must have taken my ladder away. the man started pacing back and forth wondering how to get down. so, the sunlight made one of the birds wake up. bird:i can't breathe. so i must be catching a bad cold. i drank too much, saki rice wine last night. was a little tipsy. i don't remember. any way. think can't move. someone is leaning on me so who is it.
to exist, right? our strategy in the old days was to align ourselves with a big media company -- cbs. we align ourselves with yahoo! in some way and with ail -- aol in another way. you need the types of connections with more established or at least larger players in order to survive. the other reason is that the proliferation of sites has caused a change in the way people get their news. no longer do they just go to what we call destination sites, which was essentially a newspaper online. they are getting their news on facebook and google and bing and search engines. to be out there in that news sphere, you have to have different ways of attacking a and having connections and distribution arrangements. >> i would like to add that proliferation of new sites creates more demand for content, which creates more opportunity for professional writers. before you think about going into news as a business as an independent publisher, you have to think about what the need is, if there is a need in that particular space for another site, and then how you distinguish yourself and the content you pro
it at scale, and that has been the big challenge. >> can you elaborate on that? what does that mean exactly? >> we would not exist if there was not a feeling that a lot of these communities do not have the experience online of finding the information that is most relevant to them. there are a lot of great weekly newspapers. there are a lot of bulletin boards, facebook woods, you name it. there is a lot of media focused at local, but not every community has it, and even the ones that do often are not getting the kind of service that i think they used to historical because of downsizing and regional newspapers not serving those communities the way they used to. so you will have the council meeting not really being covered. we have had numerous examples where board meetings, council meetings, things that those members got used to not being covered. suddenly, they were seeing the week after week and seeing that we were there to stay. >> in the audience, do you feel like you're communities are being covered well? do you know what is going on in your back yard? do you feel like your stories being
development that works for every san franciscan. i think that remains a big issue. and balancing the budget will be a priority. has to be a priority. we will do that. we have done that time and time again. public safety is also something we are very interested in. it has to be a priority, because if we do not have public safety, nothing else works. one of the things we are focusing on is trying to focus on how policing works in san francisco. i used to be a member of the police commission, and i learned that the most effective community policing is the policing where you have the police and the community working together. it is important to have police officers on the street and have the police presence. at the same time, there has to be a connection within the police and the community. so, that requires -- also we have a focus on violence prevention. in the mission, we are focused on gang activity. we have to balance the very important work of the police would be very important violence prevention work -- with the very importance violence prevention work we're doing on the ground. so, publ
% of the workers we encouraged to locate and beyond big-market. they will be riding to work a lot. we need to expand those lines to make sure we work with it. i know that each of the supervisors will have a minute to say, but before they do, i wanted to welcome also our business partners, people encouraging their employees to ride to work. we have jeff from wells fargo. you are still with us, right? come on out here. we have peter from green apple books. where is peter? peter, come on up here. these are also the employers working with the city, working with our supervisors, all of them, to make sure they do the best enjoying our efforts. even when we do these, it has been public/private partnerships that actually keep and maintain this. i want to be your with everybody to announce that we have already been working on how we can fund more of these, so with the jfk route that we wrote this morning, recreation and park and mta have been working with our transportation authority through the board of supervisors, and they found a grant that would immediately allow them to plan for the jfk route
be a parade this year. there is going to be a parade every year. how big an organized it will be is a credit to many people who came together this year as never before. they were led by the next persons to address you. [applause] >> thank you. my name is lisa williams and i am the chairman of the pride board. i am pleased to be here. [applause] i am very pleased to be here to celebrate pride 2011. there were some challenges. folks like you step up. the board of directors stepped up. our staff stepped up. we're here today to pick up our celebration. i would also like to thank joa quin, paul, neighborhood services, the mayor's office and staff for supporting us from the beginning to the end. i also want to thank treasurer cisneros, supervisors campos, wiener, and all the others who called and asked what they could do for us. san francisco pride has had a strong relationship with the city. i also want to recognize former supervisor dufty who has been with us in the past and is currently with us now. [applause] i would like to express my gratitude to our fellow board members. we have a lot of n
. this is the sign, according to the traveler, of the spoon used it eat the towering cream. we used to eat these big ice creams in cuba, used lots of cream. most dominica patrons were male but a few foreign women venturing to the famous establishment in the company of men from the court. one of these women was my grandmother,
for a big jewish audience and people fell in love with it. it's a true story and something that still exists now. this means god watches over -- this piece a girlfriend her boyfriend goes to war and she says, i was lucking to be in love for a little while. i had love and everything i could ever want and now he's off at war and i'm alone. and i don't know what will happen after this. will he kill another mother's child. will i have to live with that? god watch over my belove ed and all the mother's sons. [music] [applause] >> so, not sure how much time we have left? keep going. all right. right? all right. so the next few pieces i wanted to tell you about. one is by [inaudible] and the other is by the same composer that did [inaudible] those conductors the father of russian music. know this song is not a song that was a yiddish it was a russian song and translated to yiddish because people loved it so much when they immigrated to new york it became a favorite. this next piece the lark, is a beautiful piece about a small bird singing between the skies and it's poetic. and -- [music] ♪[appla
doing arrangements for count bassie and ringo starr and i see myself turning into a big fan during my teenage years in havana. so that gives you a little idea about all these connections. i was born in havana in the mid-50's and my memory have many sounds. my history of my family has given me a variety of experiences and languages. my memory is like an orgy of music. i learned at an early age to get up on my feet and dance. looking at a photograph of myself, i saw a girl dancing an irish dance. i look at me from a seated audience that avoids the music with polite applause. my audience is courteous and embodies all the mystery of creation. my audience is my irish catalan and spanish family. the eyes of my family activate the dance but i was disoriented and forget the steps, but i wanted the dance to continue. i grew up in havana surplded by murphies, jeovese, all speaking spanish. this was in the late 50's. my grandfather and my father, like many other irish who went to cuba during the past three centuries, became integrated into the cuban society and many used spanish as their mother
three years, we do not want to come back with another big bond. what we would like to try to do is get the street repaving back to the general fund. build up the general fund so that it can cover the streets. it may at the 100%, so we are looking at taking back the vehicle license fee that the state now has. they use it for everything but our streets. we need to take that local decision and get our vehicle license fee back to our streets. the combination of those two will colon -- continue to allow us to have a good pot of money to continue maintaining the streets at a high level. but these three years will only keep us at the current level. it will not get us into a better place because of all of the backlog of streets in disrepair. i want to make sure that we have done enough so that it does not increase fivefold, if we did not do anything. that is the danger. i am spending my saturday -- weekends -- talking to neighborhood groups about pension reform, the street repaving bond. those are two important things we are doing. we will also be introducing a half cent sales tax to take the
raised into a scar at the end. thank you. thank you. [applause] [horns honking] announcer: big dreams and good grades aren't enough to get into college. there are actual steps you need to take. finding someone who can help is the first and most important. for the next steps, go to knowhow2go.org. [music] ♪[applause] thank you. >> thank you for applauding. never know. [laughter]. so, these next few pieces are jewish art songs the jewish art song is not something that most people know about even if you are into classical music. raise your hand if you know shoemoner shoebert? these songs are actually in yiddish but they are art songs. they are beautiful. and they are not done. right. soy, i hope you enjoy the next few pieces. i will describe them. the first was written by [inaudible] a song that has almost nonsentence words but it's your time to be with god and your moment alone with whatever you need. i hope you appreciate this one. [music] ♪[applause] >> thank you. so the next piece, it's beautiful. this is yiddish a beautiful song that was given to me by george rosenside who is
. i was not in business until 1961. he made a big deal out of working in clay. the things he was doing was something never seen before. >> it is a large scale bronze. it has been sitting here of the hall of justice since 1971. talk about what happens to the work of art out of the elements. >> the arts commission commissioned the piece. they did not set aside money for repair. it has slowly changed color. it was black. it has been restored. >> it has been restored to the original patina. >> there was no damage done to its. i do not think there were any holes made in it. they have been working on it for six or eight weeks. it is practically ready to go. i am very excited to see it done. >> over the course of the arts in richmond program, we have added almost 800 works of art into the public space. maintaining that is not something that the bond funds allow us to do. this is why you came up with the idea of art care. >> i hope we get the community going and get people who really like to be involved. we will give them a chance to be involved. if you are interested in art, this is a marvelo
] how about a big hand for all our great teachers? [applause] none of us would be here without them.
where there's a big boulder jammed into the bottom. every place has this backward trail, this labyrinth, leading you around. i was walking arpd this maze for about an hour before coming here and it does the same kind of thing where your mind settles, where you have to pay attention to where you are going. because if you look up for too long at all the passing architecture, you will forget where you are on the maze. you will end up in the wrong spot. you will end up going the wrong direction and you won't be able to find your way to the center. of course, out in the desert, you can't just walk off of the maze and out the front door and back into the street. out in the desert, you are there. the cliffs stand around you. the mazes are everywhere, passages opening up left and right. to write this book, house of rain, i walked a little bit over a thousand miles in legs from the four corners region from arizona, new mexico, colorado and california meet down to the chijuajua area of new mexico. there was one excavation along the way i remember out in the desert nears winslow, arizona. the dese
. this was a big deal getting married. we have talked to people together for 38, 40 years. they are excited and nervous. >> once we figured a way to have a security area for appointments for license and ceremony. we looked at the north light court how it's structured. how people would come in and the work flow of that area. there is a check-in area in front of the central entrance and they would verify their appointments and they would proceed. >> my wife who works for the city told me they were looking for volunteers. and that's me. so, i was interested in helping out. and i think it's those people that have been together for a long time that are the most moving story. i am sure the young people appreciate, the more you appreciate the change. >> i think what's also moving is the fact that everyone that works in the city is enthusiastic. everybody in city hall. they are very excited and behind the whole change going into affect. >> i just got an email. i work for the san francisco public library. they needed volunteers. it was something i wanted to do. i have friends who have been married.
. the big one that everyone has seen in their lifetime is, when i was a kid, tv was free. across america, it was funded by advertisers. today, the vast majority of americans pay a fee to get television. if the contact mix is right, hard journalism, entertainment, people will pay. all along the spectrum from the complete the paid to be completely ad-funded, you see it all today. one of the crisis we have now is the old model of classified advertising, paying for hard news journalism on paper has broken the, and is being replaced. that business model change had been a constant for 150 years. there are millions of models that work, and will be, and capital can chase them, as you get a 10x return, as you described. >> we want to get to everyone's questions. >> my name is alex. i have heard two major themes about new media. one, that it has a radical democratic potential, low barrier to entry, but i have also heard repeated again and again, in order for your model to be successful, in order for your web site to be successful, you have to hitch your wagon to a large, well-funded, established m
in the big gallery. >> i noticed a lot of artists doing really site-specific work. >> this is a pile of balloons, something that is so familiar, like a child's balloon. in this proportion, suddenly, it becomes something out of a dream. >> or a nightmare. >> may be a nightmare. >> this one over here is even harder to figure out what the initial material is. >> this is made out of puffy paint. often, kids use it to decorate their clothes. she has made all these lines of paint. >> for the pieces we are looking at, is there a core of foam or something in the middle of these pieces that she built on top of? >> i'm not telling. >> ah, a secret. >> this silver is aluminum foil, crumbled of aluminum foil. her aesthetic is very much that quiet, japanese spatial thing that i really admire. their attention to the materiality of the things of the world. >> this is a nice juxtaposition you have going on right now. you have a more established artists alongside and emerging artists. is that something important to you as well? >> very important in this space, to have artists who really have not show
to be more kid- friendly, more youth-oriented. i think you could have a big input to make sure that what we are doing will be there for you to raise families as well. i want to congratulate all the nominees tonight. all of you who have been participating in this competition for the fellowship have been doing great work. i have been reading through some of the accomplishments that you are a part of. i got to meet some of you, luckily, last month when you participated in youth advocacy day, but you also followed up -- some of you were at the old school cafe with what house representatives about what the youths were looking at in terms of their future, participation in the city. here in city hall, we are serious about having programs that not only help you out, but to make sure you get the support you need to be successful. we want you and need you to be successful. without that, we are literally a soulless city. whether it is being able to traverse on a good muni system, having a good education system, or being able to work in a company like twitter. i am working with two great supervisors an
appropriate. >> the other big shock is that the moderates seem to have won this round. people thought, progressives have themselves on the board. there is no reason that they will not get together and take a noted leader who is a progressive to be interim mayor, and then stayed there for another term. the great thing about being in term mayor is to get to run as an incumbent. the fact that the progressives could not get together to get somebody into office as interim mayor in their own self-interest was very surprising for a lot of us. >> what happened in the last month in city hall was an incredible show of democracy that was part policy, part politics, and it all came together, and more than anything -- not just from a reporter's perspective, often was this? but there was a public interest as well on what was going on in san francisco government. we take it for
that san francisco is not a big business-friendly city. i think we started to go in the wrong direction. the reason why we started walking down that path largely was because of political ideology. when you deal with me, you are dealing with facts, less than politics. i really want to have a positive impact on the city overall. >> good afternoon, everyone. how are you? >> good. >> it's a nice day today. thank you for coming out to our community event. please give a round of [applause] to them. we have a lot of development going on. you see how lovely leland street looks. do you like it? >> yes. >> beautiful, isn't it? we are going to continue. we have a library that is going to be opening up in june. that's right. so i will see you all there at the library. there is a lot of activity going on. it is important we remain connected and engaged. >> would you mind if we were to pull the seniors together and translate for me in a mini meeting? >> yes, sir. >> what we are going ready to do is we are going to have a quick little mini meeting to -- because we didn't translate my short message bef
it was something that was a big concern and worry for my family at the time. i remember thinking even at that age how important it was to consider what the economics were in communities, whether people had or felt that they had opportunities or did not have opportunities, and what role it was that government played in those outcomes. >> [inaudible] supervisor chu: that is what really put me on the path to public policy. so i pursued public policy both at occidental college where i went to school as an undergrad, and also uc berkeley where i pursued public policy. i work on public finance for a while after i graduated and came back to government to really pursue that. ever since then, i have stayed here and fallen in love with how wonderful the bay area is. it is a really great place to be. all around the room, you will see a lot of great financial institutions. talk to them. you will see people who can help you with financial aid. talk to them. he will see departments that might have summer job opportunities. talk to them. utilize your opportunities today. learn a little bit about what you should
. that flexibility is called the flow -- float in our charter, and that is a big distinction with the alternative proposal that is still being marketed by mr. adachi. it is important for you to know that. that distinction called vested rights. many cities across the country -- when they have not considered the employees' pension has a vested right, they get into legal trouble very quickly. that is why you see litigation around the country sponsored by employee groups who have never been consulted with, being demanded that they pay more into the pension, but there is no consideration of their vested rights. that concept is embedded in our measure were in good and bad times, we share, so they get something out of this reform. because they get something out of it, they are vested in it. the unions continue to view, as i do, that the alternative proposal being sponsored by mr. adachi does not consider vested rights and therefore will be litigated. in that litigation, there is a great chance in my opinion that the proposal will lose. i am not the city attorney, but if you ask the city attorney, as we
as most of you all know, i am a big giants fan. so it is a privilege for me to meet each and every one of our all starts here. we want to thank the giants for supporting us. [applause] >> i think if you're going to continue with your intellectual honesty, i hope you vote against every project from here on out that includes below market rate units. because the same legal argument you're making to argue that this development agreement is invalid is the same one you should be making to the ordinance. >> next is the senior member of the board of supervisors, not so much in terms of age but in terms of terms of service, and a man who nominated the mayor who is about to be sworn in. sean elsbernd. >> i was born and raised in district 7, montessori school right up the block. a grade school right down the street. my mom owned a children's clothing store right down the block, and i am lived here all my life, 30 years, and i have every intention of raising my family here. went down to a small school in los angeles, claremont mckenna, and came back here for law school and graduated. went to w
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)